Portraits of people living on a dollar a day – in pictures

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More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane

Alvaro Kalancha Quispe, aged 9, releases alpacas and llamas to graze before school,  and rounds them up in the evening. He lives inthe Akamani mountain range of Bolivia, 13,000 feet above sea level, where the homes have no insulation, no electricity, and no beds.
Alvaro Kalancha Quispe, nine, releases alpacas and llamas to graze before school, and rounds them up in the evening. He lives in the Akamani mountain range of Bolivia, 13,000ft above sea level, where the homes have no insulation, no electricity, and no beds.
Fati, aged 8, works with other children searching through hazardous waste on an e-waste dump in Accra, Ghana.  Balancing a bucket on her head containing the metal she has found, tears stream down her face as the result of the pain from malaria.
Fati, eight, works with other children searching through hazardous waste on an waste dump for electronic devices in Accra, Ghana. Balancing a bucket on her head containing the metal she has found, tears stream down her face as the result of the pain from malaria.
Hunupa Begum, 13, who has been blind for the past 10 years, lives in New Delhi, India. Begging is her family's only income - her mother and brother are too ill to work and her father is dead.
Hunupa Begum, 13, who has been blind for the past 10 years, lives in New Delhi, India. Begging is her family’s only income – her mother and brother are too ill to work and her father is dead.
Hora Florin, aged 28, grew up in a Romanian orphanage, and now lives underground in a sewer in Buacharest where the heating vents keep him warm at night.
Hora Florin, 28, grew up in a Romanian orphanage, and now lives underground in a sewer in Bucharest where the heating vents keep him warm at night.
Labone, aged 27, who works at a brothel in Jessore, Bangladesh with her daughter who was fathered by a client. All the money she earns is given to her madam.
Labone, 27, works at a brothel in Jessore, Bangladesh with her daughter, who was fathered by a client.
Vishal Singh, aged 6, cares for a baby girl while her mother is away, in the Kusum Pahari slum in south Delhi, India. Vishal is lucky in one way, when he is not working he is able to attend a school for slum children.
Vishal Singh, six, cares for a baby girl while her mother is away, in the Kusum Pahari slum in south Delhi, India. Vishal is lucky in one sense: when he is not working he is able to attend a school for slum children.
Subadra Devi, aged 40, works on a construction site in Dharamsala, India.
Subadra Devi, 40, works on a construction site in Dharamsala, India.
Four-year-old Ana-Maria Tudor lives in Bucharest, Romania. Her father is too ill to work and the family face eviction from their one room home which has no bathroom or running water.
Four-year-old Ana-Maria Tudor lives in Bucharest, Romania. Her father is too ill to work and the family face eviction from their one-room home, which has no bathroom or running water.
The Kayayo are girls in Ghana who travel to cities to work as market porters. They live communally,  often near or on top of the city dump. Sharifa Monaro, (centre), aged 23, works long hours for as little as 50 cents a day.
The Kayayo are girls in Ghana who travel to cities to work as market porters. They live communally, often near or on top of the city dump. Sharifa Monaro, (centre), 23, works long hours for as little as 50 cents a day.
Ninankor Gmafu aged 6 is typical of children  all over the world who work to support their familes. Here he herds cattle in the rain in the Volta region of Ghana. He dreams of going to school, but that is very unlikely.
Ninankor Gmafu, six, is typical of children all over the world who work to support their families. Here he herds cattle in the rain in the Volta region of Ghana. He dreams of going to school, but that is very unlikely.
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