D-day landings scenes in 1944 and now – interactive

Roye Railway Station

Peter Macdiarmid has taken photographs of locations in France and England to match with archive images taken before, during and after the D-day landings. The Allied invasion to liberate mainland Europe from Nazi occupation during the second world war took place on 6 June 1944. Operation Overlord was the largest seaborne invasion in military history, with more than 156,000 Allied troops storming the beaches of France

Photography then and now lets you move through time by tapping or clicking on a historic image to reveal the modern view. You can drag or swipe to control the speed of the transformation

Live blog: coverage of the D-day anniversary

 

 

WeymouthWeymouth
June 1944: Boats full of US troops wait to leave Weymouth to take part in Operation Overlord. 5 April 2014: A view of the harbour of the English town today. This location was used as a launching place for Allied troops participating in the invasion of Nazi-occupied France on D-day. Photographs by Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Moreton-in-Marsh
May 1944: Ammunition stored in the town square of Moreton-in-Marsh shortly before D-day. 12 May 2014: A view of the high street in the English town today. Photographs by Frank Scherschel/Time & Life/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Omaha Beach
June 1944: American craft of all styles pictured at Omaha Beach, Normandy, during the first stages of the Allied invasion. 7 May 2014: A view of the beach near Colleville-sur-Mer, France. Photographs by Popperfoto/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Nan Red
6 June 1944: Royal Marine Commandos of Headquarters, 4th Special Service Brigade, make their way from LCI(S) (Landing Craft Infantry Small) onto ‘Nan Red’ Beach at Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer. 6 May 2014: A view of the sea in the Juno beach area today. Photographs by Lt Handford/IWM/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Juno Beach
6 June 1944: Troops of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division land at Juno Beach on the outskirts of Bernières-sur-Mer on D-day. 5 May 2014: A view of the seafront and beach in Normandy today. 340 Canadian soldiers lost their lives in the battle for the beachhead. Photographs by Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Sainte Mere Eglise
1944: A French armoured column passing through Sainte-Mère-Église receives a warm welcome from its inhabitants. 7 May 2014: A view of the high street today. Photographs by Popperfoto/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Sainte Marie du Mont
12 June 1944: A group of American soldiers stand in the village of Sainte-Marie-du-Mont, which was liberated by paratroopers of the 501st and 506th Regiments of the 101st Airborne Division. 7 May 2014: A view of the old village fountain today. Photographs by Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Bernieres-sur-Mer
6 June 1944: A Canadian soldier directs traffic in Bernières-sur-Mer. 14,000 Canadian soldiers had landed at nearby Juno Beach. 5 May 2014: A view of Notre-Dame Nativity church today. Photographs by Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
Saint Lo
July 1944: United States Army trucks and jeeps drive through the ruins of Saint-Lo. 7 May 2014: A view of the roadway in the town today. Saint-Lo was almost totally destroyed by 2,000 Allied bombers when they attacked German troops stationed there during Operation Overlord. Photographs by Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
German Prisoners
June 1944: German prisoners are guarded by British soldiers from the 2nd Army on Juno Beach. 8 May 2014: A view of the beach in Bernières-sur-Mer in Normandy today. Photographs by Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty
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